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Do You Have To Use A Slide To Play A Cigar Box Guitar?

No. You can play tradtional style fretted cigar box guitar as well. When using a slide, any slide will work, it's really a matter of preference.

Slide guitar or bottleneck guitar is a particular method or technique for playing the guitar. The term slide is in reference to the sliding motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the original material of choice for such slides, which were the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of the strings in the normal manner (by pressing the string against frets), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length, and pitch. This slide can then be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.

Since the introduction of slide guitar playing in the early 1900s, many different materials have been used to play slide guitar. Various smooth hard objects may be used as a slide such as glass, copper, porcelain and metal. One of the most common is the neck of a glass bottle, which is slipped over one of the fingers of the fretting hand. The term "bottleneck guitar" derives from this. A glass, stainless steel, brass, or chrome tube of approximately the same size (typically one to two inches long and ? inch diameter) may also be used. There are also the Mudslide porcelain and Moonshine Slides ceramic slides, invented by Terrie Lambert in 1990, which are glazed on the outside but porous on the inside, so that finger moisture is absorbed, preventing slippage. Technically a slide can be made with any material, so long as it resonates, and the craftsmanship is good. Examples include stag antler and buffalo horn, although slides like these are not often sold in mainstream shops, if at all, as the time and effort needed to create one is often too much when conventional slides are available. An alternative method is to use a solid metal bar or rod, also about the same size as above, laid across the strings of the guitar and held by the fingers of the fretting hand being laid on it to either side, parallel to it. Shotglasses, pipes, and stones have also been used to good effect, as have rings, spoons and even cigarette lighters.

Below are exampls of various guitar slides.